Skip 
Navigation Link

1215 South Walnut Ave.
Demopolis, AL 36732 mapmap

Access to Care: 800.239.2901

Aging & Geriatrics
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
1 in 9 U.S. Adults Over 45 Reports Memory ProblemsMedical Marijuana a Hit With SeniorsCost Keeps Many Americans From Getting Hearing AidsAHA: Aging LGBT Seniors a 'Major Public Health Issue'Health Tip: Recognizing Hearing Loss"Markers" of Alzheimers Do Not Doom You to DementiaSleep Apnea Rarely Investigated in Older AdultsPsychological Therapies May Help Older Adults With Chronic PainHearing Aid Use Linked to Beneficial Health OutcomesAnnual Visits May Not Increase Cognitive Impairment DetectionSleepless Nights Show Ties To Alzheimer's RiskPoor Sleep May Heighten Alzheimer's RiskPositive Age Beliefs May Protect Seniors Against DementiaYour Attitude About Aging Might Affect Odds for DementiaWhat Works Best to Keep Drivers With Dementia Off the RoadCognitive Training Aids Memory in People With Mild ImpairmentFalls More Common in Elderly With Cognitive ImpairmentGetting Active Could Help Boost Memory, Experts SayReading Aloud Can Be a Memory BoosterCAPABLE Program Saves Money for Seniors With DisabilityCould New 'Brain Training' Program Help Prevent Dementia?Health Tip: Hearing Loss May Affect Brain HealthNew Finding Hints at Clue to DementiaHealth Tip: Tai Chi May Help Prevent FallsOlder People May Be More Prone to Reveal Suicidal ThoughtsFailing Sense of Smell Tied to Dementia RiskIs Dementia Declining Among Older Americans?Patients' Hearing Loss May Mean Poorer Medical CareDo Fewer Nightly Dreams Mean Higher Dementia Risk in Seniors?Yoga May Boost Aging BrainsMidlife Behaviors May Affect Your Dementia RiskHome-Based Care Teams Offer Help for Those With Dementia
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook ReviewsSelf-Help Groups
Related Topics

Depression: Depression & Related Conditions
Elder Care

Psychological Therapies May Help Older Adults With Chronic Pain


HealthDay News
Updated: May 9th 2018

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, May 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults with chronic pain, psychological interventions have small benefits, including reducing pain and catastrophizing beliefs, according to a review published online May 7 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Bahar Niknejad, M.D., from the Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk, and colleagues extracted data from 22 studies with 2,608 participants to examine the efficacy of psychological interventions in older adults (60+ years) with chronic pain.

The researchers found that there were differences of standardized mean differences at post-treatment for pain intensity (P = 0.006), pain interference (P = 0.12), depressive symptoms (P = 0.14), anxiety (P = 0.09), catastrophizing beliefs (P = 0.046), self-efficacy (P = 0.02), physical function (P = 0.96), and physical health (P = 0.24). For pain only, there was evidence of effects persisting beyond the post-treatment assessment. Only mode of therapy (group versus individual) had a consistent effect in favor of group-based therapy in moderator analyses.

"Psychological interventions for the treatment of chronic pain in older adults have small benefits, including reducing pain and catastrophizing beliefs and improving pain self-efficacy for managing pain. These results were strongest when delivered using group-based approaches," the authors write. "Research is needed to develop and test strategies that enhance the efficacy of psychological approaches and sustainability of treatment effects among older adults with chronic pain."

One author disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Abstract/Full Text