Skip 
Navigation Link

1215 South Walnut Ave.
Demopolis, AL 36732 mapmap

Access to Care: 800.239.2901

Pain Management
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Hospitals Should, and Could, Avoid IV Opioids: StudyOpioid Makers' Perks to Docs Tied to More PrescriptionsPsychological Therapies May Help Older Adults With Chronic PainStudy Finds 31 Percent Use No Opioids After SurgeryAddictive Opioids Still Overprescribed After Surgery: StudyDoctors Curbing First-Time Prescriptions for OpioidsFDA Recalls Kratom Products Due to Salmonella ThreatMillions Get Wrong Treatment for Back Pain: StudyManaging Pain With Fewer Opioids After Joint ReplacementOpioids Don't Top Non-Opioids for Pain-Related FunctionOpioids Not Best Option for Back Pain, Arthritis, Study FindsGroup CBT, Pain Education Improve Pain, Physical FunctionChronic Opioid Users May Wish to Taper Opioid UseSome Pain Patients Can Cut Opioid Dose and Still Get ReliefAnother Downside to Opioid Use: Pneumonia?Long-Term Opioid Use Down Among U.S. Vets: StudyLosing Weight Eases Obesity-Related Pain. But How Much Is Enough?Do Over-the-Counter Painkillers Alter Emotions, Reasoning?Opioid Prescribing Trends in the VA Similar to Other SettingsHow to Avoid Opioid Addiction After SurgeryOpioids Aren't America's Only Painkiller ProblemWeight Loss Among Obese Tied to Improvements in Chronic PainPrescribing of Opioids Adds to Patient Satisfaction With CareOpioid Abuse Rises When Prescriptions Are RenewedPain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire Helps to Evaluate Migraine PainImprovement Needed in Ob-Gyn Opioid Prescribing PracticesGabapentin Doesn't Cut Time to Pain Cessation After SurgeryAmount of Opioids Prescribed After Hospital Discharge VariesDrug May Help Surgical Patients Stop Opioids SoonerASHP: Joint Commission Impact on Pain Management Discussed'Pill Mill' Docs Only Partly to Blame for Opioid EpidemicChronic Pain Common Among Those Who OD on OpioidsKids Still Getting Risky Painkiller After TonsillectomyPatients Use ~Half of Opioids Prescribed After HysterectomyIn ER, Combination of Ibuprofen, Acetaminophen Relieves PainOpioids Not the Only Answer for Pain Relief in the ERASA: Opioid-Free Anesthesia Feasible for Surgical ProceduresSkip Opioid Treatment for Migraine in the ERAround the World, Too Little Relief for PainPost-Op Opioids: How Much Is Enough?ERs Prescribing Opioids at Lower Doses, Shorter DurationsBig Rise in Hospitalized Kids With Opioid Side EffectsMost Opioid Use Concentrated in Top 10 Percent of UsersCommon Painkillers May Boost Blood Pressure in Arthritis PatientsMany Migraine Sufferers Given Unecessary Opioids, Study FindsSleep, Caffeine Use May Play Role in Post-Op PainLonger Prescriptions Make Opioid Abuse More Likely: StudyMany Prescribed Opioids Even After OverdoseReview: Cannabis May Alleviate Neuropathic PainOpioid Prescription Rates Higher in Cancer Survivors
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Depression: Depression & Related Conditions
Medical Disorders
Mental Disorders
Medications

Hospitals Should, and Could, Avoid IV Opioids: Study

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: May 14th 2018

new article illustration

MONDAY, May 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to pain management for hospital patients, opioid pills or injections are less dangerous and just as effective as giving the drug intravenously, a new study shows.

The results "have the potential to be practice-changing," study author Dr. Adam Ackerman, clinical instructor in internal medicine at Yale School of Medicine, said in a university news release.

The researchers explained that to relieve pain, hospital patients are typically given opioid drugs in one of three forms: pill, injection or IV. The risk of side effects is higher with IV because the opioids rapidly penetrate the central nervous system, the researchers said.

Previous research has shown that even one IV dose of opioids can cause brain changes associated with addiction.

The three-month pilot study tested the new approach to opioid prescribing in a few hundred hospital patients. The results: The patients' IV opioid dosing was reduced by 84 percent, they had less overall exposure to opioids, and their pain control was as good or better than a control group of patients who received typical opioid prescribing.

"The data shows that the non-IV use of opioids can reduce overall opioid use in adult inpatients with no change in pain control, and potentially an improvement," said study co-author Dr. Robert Fogerty, an associate professor of medicine at Yale.

"It's an example of less is more," he added.

Changing how opioids are given to hospital patients could be one way to fight the opioid addiction and overdose epidemic in the United States, according to the study authors.

Study co-author Dr. Patrick O'Connor, chief of general internal medicine at Yale, said the study "represents an important piece of the puzzle in terms of how opioids can be used more safely and effectively in clinical practice.

"It also represents a critical strategy for reducing the potential risk of opioid-related complications, including overdose and death," he added.

The study was published May 14 in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse has more about prescription opioids.