Skip 
Navigation Link

1215 South Walnut Ave.
Demopolis, AL 36732 map map 

Access to Care: 334.289.2410

Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
High Measles Rates Mean Kids, Adults Need Proper Vaccination: CDCCPAP Brings Longer Life for Obese People With Sleep Apnea: StudyAHA News: Is Yoga Heart-Healthy? It's No Stretch to See Benefits, Science SuggestsMigraine Pain Linked to Raised Suicide RiskInsurers' Denials of Opioid Coverage Spurs CDC to Clarify GuidelinesColorado Sees Spike in ER Visits After Pot Made LegalNeed to Be Vaccinated? Try Your Local PharmacyAHA News: Opioid Meds Pose Danger to Kidney Disease PatientsMajor Flooding Can Bring Skin Infection DangersFDA Aims to Strengthen Sunscreen RulesAs U.S. Measles Outbreaks Spread, Why Does 'Anti-Vax' Movement Persist?Health Tip: Know Your Family's Medical HistoryDisrupted Sleep Plagues Hospital Patients, But New Program Might HelpClimate Change Already Hurting Human Health, Review ShowsCalling All Blood Donors …Radiation Doses From CT Scans Vary WidelyCan Herbal Drug Kratom Kill?Health Tip: Use Medical Devices SafelyDon't Let Holiday Season Stress Worsen Your Allergies, AsthmaA Family Tragedy Highlights Carbon Monoxide DangerPhysical Therapy Can Help You Avoid Opioids When Joint Pain StrikesEczema Can Drive People to Thoughts of Suicide: StudyHospitalizations Rising Among the HomelessMillions of Americans Still Breathing Secondhand Smoke: ReportMany Americans Unaware of Promise of Targeted, 'Personalized' Medicine: PollMost Americans Lie to Their DoctorsWhat's Best for Babies With Recurring Ear InfectionsAfter a Spouse's Death, Sleep Woes Up Health RisksConcussion Tied to Suicide RiskMajor Injuries Take a Toll on Mental HealthNew Cholesterol Guidelines Focus on Personalized ApproachHome Health-Care Tests: Proceed With CautionU.S. Hospitals Making Headway Against InfectionsHard Arteries Hard on the Aging Brain?Widely Used Antipsychotics May Not Ease Delirium in ICUNew Nerve Stimulation Technique Might Relieve Back PainAHA: Stiffening of Blood Vessels May Point to Dementia RiskHeart Defects, Sleep Apnea a Deadly Mix for InfantsDozens of Medical Groups Join Forces to Improve Diagnoses1 in 12 Americans Lives With Debilitating Chronic PainUrgent Care Centers Ease ER Burden in U.S.AHA: Heart Health Research of 9/11 Survivors Slowly Realized, 17 Years LaterAHA: Wildfire Smoke Threatens Health of Those Near and FarStem Cells Restore Some Vision in Blind MiceDialysis Linked to Dementia in SeniorsHealth Tip: Making an Emergency CallEye Disease Link to Alzheimer's SeenPreschoolers' Parents May Be Unprepared to Treat AsthmaHealth Woes Hit 1 in 7 Babies Exposed to Zika in U.S. TerritoriesSprained Ankle? Opioid Rx More Likely in Some States Than Others
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

Major Injuries Take a Toll on Mental Health

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Nov 12th 2018

new article illustration

MONDAY, Nov. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- People who've suffered major traumatic injuries are at much greater risk for mental health problems and suicide, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 19,000 people in the Canadian province of Ontario who suffered serious injuries. Most of the injuries (89 percent) were accidental rather than intentional (for example, car crashes and falls).

"Major trauma was associated with a 40 percent increased rate of hospital admission for one or more mental health diagnoses," said study author Dr. Christopher Evans, from the department of emergency medicine at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario.

"The most common mental health diagnoses were alcohol abuse, other drug abuse disorders and major depressive disorders," Evans added.

Children and teens younger than 18 who had suffered a major injury had the largest increased risk of mental health-related hospital admission, the findings showed.

The researchers also found that the suicide rate among people who'd suffered major injuries was 70 per 100,000 people, compared with 11.5 per 100,000 people in the general population.

The study was published Nov. 12 in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

"Patients who suffer major injuries are at significant risk of admissions to hospital with mental health diagnoses in the years after their injury and of having high suicide rates during this period," Evans and his colleagues said in a journal news release.

Mental health support should be offered to all traumatic injury patients, especially high-risk patients, the study authors concluded.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers resources on home and recreational safety.