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Health Tip: Use Medical Devices Safely


HealthDay News
Updated: Dec 17th 2018

(HealthDay News) -- A medical device is used to diagnose, cure or treat a condition, or to prevent disease.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration says a medical device can range in size from a hand-held glucometer to a large breathing ventilator.

Here's the FDA's advice for safe use of a medical device:

  • Understand how your device works, and keep instructions accessible.
  • Understand and properly respond to device alarms.
  • Keep a back-up plan and supplies in the event of an emergency.
  • Keep emergency numbers available and updated.
  • Educate your family and caregivers about your device.
  • Have your doctor and health-care team review your condition and recommend any equipment changes.
  • Report serious malfunctions to the device maker and to the FDA.