Skip 
Navigation Link

1215 South Walnut Ave.
Demopolis, AL 36732 map map 

Access to Care: 334.289.2410

Health Policy & Advocacy
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
When Meds Are Free, Patients Take Them More OftenSpurred by Mass Shootings, More Americans View Mentally Ill as ViolentPacemakers, Insulin Pumps Could Be Hacking Targets: FDAAHA News: Make Neighborhoods Green for Heart Health? The Idea Is Taking RootPoll Finds Many Young Americans Think Vaping is SafeWhat Do Hospital Cyber Attackers Want to Know About You?U.S. Minorities' Recent Health Gains May Be SlowingPaid Family Leave Helps Keep Babies' Vaccines on Track: StudyDon't Let Fear of Cancer Keep You From Doctor VisitsMaker Halts Distribution of Generic Zantac Due to Possible CarcinogenCould Profit Be a Factor in Kidney Transplant Decisions?Get Up-to-the-Minute Safety Alerts Sent Straight to Your InboxPurdue Pharma to Settle Opioid Crisis Lawsuits, May Pay Up to $12 BillionDocs Prescribe More Opioids at Certain Time of DayFDA Warns Juul About Illegal Marketing Claims and Pitch to YouthComing Soon: A 'Pot Breathalyzer'?More CT, MRI Scans Being Used, Despite Calls to Cut BackCancer Overtakes Heart Disease as #1 Killer of Middle-Aged in Wealthy NationsOxyContin Maker Purdue Offering Up to $12 Billion to Settle Opioid ClaimsThousands of Kidneys Thrown Away by U.S. Transplant CentersJudge Orders Johnson & Johnson to Pay $572 Million Over Opioid Drug CrisisEvery Sudden Infant Death Deserves a Closer Look: ReportYour Chocolate Pot 'Edible' Could Hold a Hidden DangerCBD Is the Rage, But More Science Needed on Safety, EffectivenessMany Parents Would Switch Doctors Over Vaccination Policy, Poll FindsPot Poisonings Among Kids, Teens Double After Medical Marijuana Law PassedNearly Half of U.S. Patients Keep Vital Secrets From Their DoctorsFDA Proposes Graphic Warning Labels on CigarettesMany Doctors Refusing Care of People Prescribed OpioidsAll U.S. Adults Should Be Screened for Illicit Drug Use, National Panel UrgesAmericans' Trust in Scientists Follows a Sharp Political DivideRaising Legal Smoking Age to 21 WorksPure CBD Won't Make You Fail a Drug Test, But…Health Tip: Donate Blood SafelyRoutine Screening for Pancreatic Cancer Not Warranted, Expert Panel SaysResearchers 'Spin' Clinical Trial Findings in Top Psych Journals: StudyMore 'Buyer Beware' Warnings for Unregulated Stem Cell ClinicsSome of Most Common, Deadly Cancers Get the Least Research MoneyTraveling Abroad? Make Sure Your Measles Shot Is Up to DateBlood Donations Needed: Red CrossKeep Unused Meds Out of the Hands of AddictsFew U.S. Universities Are Smoke-FreeNeed Emergency Air Lift to Hospital? It Could Cost You $40,000California Took on Anti-Vaxxers, and WonAnti-Vaccine Movement a 'Man-Made' Health Crisis, Scientists WarnAHA News: Even the Threat of Homelessness May Bring Higher Stroke RiskFDA Warns Two Kratom Marketers About False ClaimsExperts Want Doctors to Add Vaping to Youth Prevention PitchMany Health Care Workers With Flu, Colds Still Go to Work: StudyGlobal Efforts to Cut Smoking Show Mixed Results
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Health Insurance
Healthcare

Blood Donation by Teen Girls May Raise Anemia Risk

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Feb 25th 2019

new article illustration

MONDAY, Feb. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Giving blood can be a way to help your community, but teenaged girls face special risks when donating, a new study shows.

Specifically, they face a higher chance of developing iron deficiency and anemia, so they require additional measures to protect them, the researchers said.

Blood donation is largely a safe procedure, but the blood loss that happens during menstruation every month may make girls more vulnerable, the scientists noted.

To learn more about that risk, the investigators analyzed data gathered from nearly 9,700 women, aged 16 to 49, between 1999 and 2010. Just over 2,400 of them were aged 16 to 19. Almost 11 percent of the teens had donated blood within the past 12 months, compared with about 6 percent of the adults.

Serum ferritin levels (a surrogate for total iron levels) were significantly lower among blood donors than among non-donors in both teens and adults, the findings showed.

Rates of iron-deficiency anemia were 9.5 percent among teen donors and almost 8 percent among adult donors, compared with 6 percent among non-donors in both age groups. The researchers also found that nearly 23 percent of teen donors and over 18 percent of adult donors had no iron stores.

The findings highlight the risks of iron deficiency in teen girls who donate blood, according to the study published Feb. 19 in the journal Transfusion.

Some federal policies and regulations already exist to protect donors from iron deficiency, including hemoglobin screening, a minimum weight to donate and an eight-week interval between donations for repeat whole blood donation.

However, more protections are necessary for teen donors, such as oral iron supplementation, increasing the minimum time interval between donations, or donating other blood products such as platelets or plasma rather than whole blood, the researchers suggested.

"We're not saying that eligible donors shouldn't donate. There are already issues with the lack of blood supply," said study co-leader Dr. Aaron Tobian, director of transfusion medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore.

"However, new regulations or accreditation standards could help make blood donation even safer for young donors," Tobian added in a Hopkins news release.

About 6.8 million people in the United States donate blood each year, according to the American Red Cross, and the number of teens donating blood is on the rise due to blood drives at high schools. In 2015, teens aged 16 to 18 made approximately 1.5 million blood donations.

More information

The American Red Cross has more on blood donation.