Skip 
Navigation Link

1215 South Walnut Ave.
Demopolis, AL 36732 map map 

Access to Care: 334.289.2410

Health Policy & Advocacy
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Nearly Half of U.S. Patients Keep Vital Secrets From Their DoctorsFDA Proposes Graphic Warning Labels on CigarettesMany Doctors Refusing Care of People Prescribed OpioidsAll U.S. Adults Should Be Screened for Illicit Drug Use, National Panel UrgesAmericans' Trust in Scientists Follows a Sharp Political DivideRaising Legal Smoking Age to 21 WorksPure CBD Won't Make You Fail a Drug Test, But…Health Tip: Donate Blood SafelyRoutine Screening for Pancreatic Cancer Not Warranted, Expert Panel SaysResearchers 'Spin' Clinical Trial Findings in Top Psych Journals: StudyMore 'Buyer Beware' Warnings for Unregulated Stem Cell ClinicsSome of Most Common, Deadly Cancers Get the Least Research MoneyTraveling Abroad? Make Sure Your Measles Shot Is Up to DateBlood Donations Needed: Red CrossKeep Unused Meds Out of the Hands of AddictsFew U.S. Universities Are Smoke-FreeNeed Emergency Air Lift to Hospital? It Could Cost You $40,000California Took on Anti-Vaxxers, and WonAnti-Vaccine Movement a 'Man-Made' Health Crisis, Scientists WarnAHA News: Even the Threat of Homelessness May Bring Higher Stroke RiskFDA Warns Two Kratom Marketers About False ClaimsExperts Want Doctors to Add Vaping to Youth Prevention PitchMany Health Care Workers With Flu, Colds Still Go to Work: StudyGlobal Efforts to Cut Smoking Show Mixed ResultsOne Simple Food Substitution Might Help Save the PlanetAHA News: 3 Simple Steps Could Save 94 Million Lives WorldwideRace Affects Life Expectancy in Major U.S. CitiesDrugstores Often Don't Have Opioid Antidote in Stock, Philly Study ShowsAntibiotics Pollute Rivers Worldwide: StudyAHA News: For LGBTQ Patients, Discrimination Can Become Barrier to Medical CareImmigrants Make Up 1 in 4 U.S. Health Care WorkersFDA Takes Hard Look at CBDPatients Who Read Doctors' Notes More Likely to Take Their MedsU.S. Measles Cases for 2019 Already Exceed All Annual Totals Since 1992: CDCBreathe Easier, New York City: Clean-Air Taxi Rules Are WorkingDoctor Burnout Costly for Patients, Health Care SystemBlood Banks Could Help Screen for Hereditary High CholesterolRed Cross Needs Type O Blood to Ease ShortageLess Pain, More Car Crashes: Legalized Marijuana a Mixed BagPolitical Controversies Could Fuel Bullying of LGBT Youth: StudyCBD -- It's Everywhere, But Does It Work?Brief EMS Training Saves Lives After Brain InjuryU.S. Improves Emergency Readiness, but Gaps PersistSlowing Climate Change Could Cut Health Costs, Save MoneyDispensing Opioid Antidote Without a Prescription Might Save LivesNot Just Opioids: Deaths Tied to Cocaine, Meth Are Soaring, TooMost Americans Hit Hard by Medical BillsYour Virtual Doctor Will 'See' You NowHigh Measles Rates Mean Kids, Adults Need Proper Vaccination: CDCMany Drivers Testing Positive for Marijuana, Even With Kids in Car
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Health Insurance
Healthcare

Pure CBD Won't Make You Fail a Drug Test, But…

HealthDay News
by By Amy Norton
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Aug 9th 2019

new article illustration

FRIDAY, Aug. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As the CBD craze sweeps the nation, some users may wonder whether the cannabis extract can make them fail a drug test. A preliminary study suggests the answer is "no" -- at least if the CBD is pure.

Researchers found that CBD, or cannabidiol, did not react with either of two commercially available tests used to screen for marijuana use. However, another cannabis compound -- cannabinol (CBN) -- did.

CBD and CBN are two of many chemicals found in cannabis plants. They differ from THC, the source of the marijuana "high." CBD is present in marijuana but more abundant in hemp -- cannabis plants that have little THC. CBN, meanwhile, is a THC derivative.

If you think CBD products are suddenly everywhere, you're right: There has been an explosion since last year, when Congress lifted a decades-old ban on growing hemp.

Licensed farmers can now grow the plant, as long as it contains less than 0.3% THC. The result? CBD is turning up in everything from oils and lotions to coffee and cookies.

CBD is promoted for easing anxiety, insomnia and chronic pain, among other ailments. The jury is still out on those uses, but there is some science behind the compound. Last year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a drug containing pure CBD -- called Epidiolex -- for treating certain rare, severe seizures.

CBN, meanwhile, is far less famous than its cousin, but it is used in products marketed as sleep aids.

Given that context, it's important to understand how the compounds interact with drug screening tests, said Grace Kroner, lead researcher on the new study.

She and her colleagues at the University of Utah Health Sciences Center in Salt Lake City spiked three batches of urine samples with CBD, CBN and two other cannabis compounds -- cannabichromene and cannabigerol.

The researchers tested each batch with two tests commonly used for THC screening. CBN reacted with one, while the other three compounds triggered no false-positives.

Why did only one test pick up CBN? The tests are known immunoassays -- which means they use antibodies to detect drugs. Kroner explained that there are slight differences in the antibodies that test manufacturers use -- so it's possible to get different results.

While the findings may be a relief to some CBD users, there is a big caveat: The researchers used pure CBD. In the real world, CBD products are largely unregulated and may contain other compounds due to processing.

According to Robert Fitzgerald, a professor at the University of California, San Diego's Center for Advanced Laboratory Medicine, "It would depend on the purity of the product."

On the positive side, he noted, immunoassays are only screening tests. They would be followed up by "confirmatory testing" that does distinguish THC from other compounds. But you could still have a problem if your cannabis product was contaminated with THC, Fitzgerald said.

Legally, Kroner noted, CBD products should only be produced from hemp plants with no more than 0.3% THC. But there's no way for consumers to know for sure what's in the products they buy.

A 2017 study found that about seven out of 10 CBD products did not contain the amount of cannabidiol stated on the label. And about one in five contained THC.

A false-positive on a drug test could have implications for people at work, and in their medical care. For example, some health care organizations do not allow patients to start opioid painkillers if they use marijuana.

It all points to the importance of taking "cross-reactivity" into account when a drug screening test comes back positive, Kroner said.

"Confirmatory testing should be done before any clinical decisions are made," she said.

What should you do if you use any of these products and have a drug test coming up?

The simplest course is to refrain for a while, according to Kroner. But she also advised being up front about your CBD or CBN use -- or any supplement use, for that matter -- so that your test results can be interpreted in that light.

Kroner reported the findings Monday at the annual meeting of the American Association for Clinical Chemistry in Anaheim, Calif. Studies presented at meetings are generally considered preliminary until they are published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more on CBD.