Skip 
Navigation Link

1215 South Walnut Ave.
Demopolis, AL 36732 map map 

Access to Care: 1-800-239-2901

Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
COVID-19 Causing More Stress in America Than Other Nations: SurveyPandemic Could Complicate Hurricane Season11 States Could Face ICU Doc Shortages as Coronavirus Cases SurgeYet Another Study Finds Vaccines Are SafeIn Rush to Publish, Most COVID-19 Research Isn't Reliable, Experts SayMany U.S. Homes Too Cramped to Stop COVID-19's SpreadWith Safety Steps, Moms Unlikely to Pass COVID-19 to Newborns: StudyFace Masks Making Things Tough for the DeafU.S. Air Quality Got Better During Pandemic: StudyWill CPR Save Your Life? Study Offers a Surprising AnswerLupus Drug Prevents Low Heartbeat in High-Risk Newborns: StudyMasks, Video Calls: Pandemic Is Hampering Communication for Those With Hearing ProblemsCOVID-19 Deaths Have Already Left 1.2 Million Americans GrievingWill COVID Pandemic's Environmental Benefit Last?Exposure to Iodine in the NICU May Affect Infant Thyroid FunctionZika May Have Damaged More Infants' Brains Than ExpectedCoronavirus Ups Anxiety, Depression in the LGBTQ CommunityWill the COVID-19 Pandemic Leave a Mental Health Crisis in Its Wake?AHA News: Sadness and Isolation of Pandemic Can Make Coping With Grief HarderWildfire Smoke Causes Rapid Damage to Your Health: StudyCOVID-19 Typically Mild for Babies: StudyOne-Time Treatment Eases Parkinson's -- in MiceDrug Might Relieve Low Back Pain in Whole New WayBlood Donors Will Get Results of Coronavirus Antibody Test, Red Cross SaysAre Hardened Arteries a Risk Factor for Poor Slumber?Can Talk Therapy Heal the Body, Too?COVID Got You Scared of Performing CPR? Study Finds Infection Risk Is LowHealthDay In-Depth
The AI Revolution: Robots Already Helping Humans Deliver Better Care">HealthDay In-Depth
The AI Revolution: Robots Already Helping Humans Deliver Better Care
People With Intellectual Disabilities Are Being Hit Hard by COVID-19Fewer Suicide-Related ER Visits in COVID Era, and That Has Experts Worried'Psychological Distress' Has Tripled in U.S. During Pandemic, Survey ShowsPeople Are Avoiding the ER During COVID-19 Crisis at Their Peril: StudyCoronavirus Pandemic Spurring Mental Health Crisis, Especially in the YoungAHA News: Looking for Ways to Protect Against Pandemic PTSDAs Postponed Surgeries Resume, Can U.S. Hospitals Handle the Strain?Most Americans Still More Worried About COVID-19 Spread Than the EconomyBig Need for Blood Donations as Postponed Surgeries ResumeAHA News: How Bacteria in Your Gut Interact With the Mind and BodyMusic Might Help Soothe Ailing HeartsCould an Injected Electrode Control Your Pain Without Drugs?A New Hip or Knee Can Do a Marriage Good, Study FindsOnly Half of Americans Say They'd Get a Coronavirus Vaccine: SurveyLockdown Got You Down? Experts Offer Tips to De-StressPTSD May Plague Nurses, Especially in COVID-19 EraDepression, Anxiety, PTSD May Plague Many COVID-19 SurvivorsAHA News: Caregiving Is Never Easy, and COVID-19 Has Made It HarderLayoffs and Losses: COVID-19 Leaves U.S. Hospitals in Financial CrisisFDA Goes After Unproven COVID-19 Antibody TestsDuring Droughts, Many Poor Americans Will Lack Clean Tap Water: StudyLove in the Time of Coronavirus: Couples Feel the Strain of Lockdown
Questions and AnswersVideosLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

Only Half of Americans Say They'd Get a Coronavirus Vaccine: Survey

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: May 27th 2020

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, May 27, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Even if a vaccine against the new coronavirus is developed, only half of Americans say they'd get it, a new survey finds.

It also found that 31% weren't sure if they'd get vaccinated, and about 1 in 5 said they wouldn't get vaccinated.

Of those who'd refuse a vaccine, 7 in 10 cited safety concerns, according to the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll.

"I am not an anti-vaxxer," Melanie Dries, 56, of Colorado Springs, Colo., told the AP. But, she said, "to get a COVID-19 vaccine within a year or two ... causes me to fear that it won't be widely tested as to side effects."

Others wouldn't hesitate to get the shot.

"I'm definitely going to get it," said Brandon Grimes, 35, of Austin, Texas. "As a father who takes care of his family, I think ... it's important for me to get vaccinated as soon as it's available to better protect my family."

Safety remains a top priority in developing a vaccine, said U.S. National Institutes of Health Director Dr. Francis Collins. The agency is developing a plan to test the safety and effectiveness of leading vaccine candidates in tens of thousands of people, the AP reported.

"I would not want people to think that we're cutting corners because that would be a big mistake. I think this is an effort to try to achieve efficiencies, but not to sacrifice rigor," Collins told the news service earlier this month.

"Definitely the worst thing that could happen is if we rush through a vaccine that turns out to have significant side effects," he added.

"The unexpected looms large and that's why I think for any of these vaccines, we're going to need a large safety database to provide the reassurance," Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, told the AP.

About 30% of those who wouldn't get vaccinated said they're not afraid of getting seriously ill from the coronavirus, and about 40% said they're concerned about catching COVID-19 from the shot. Most of the leading vaccine candidates don't contain the coronavirus, meaning there's no risk of infection.

The poll also found protecting themselves, their family and their community are the main reasons why people want to be vaccinated, and about 7 in 10 of those who would get vaccinated said life won't return to normal until one is available, the AP reported.

Older adults and anyone with chronic health problems such as diabetes or heart disease are at greatest risk from the new coronavirus. The poll found that 67% of people 60 and older would get vaccinated, compared with 40% of younger people.

Black and Hispanic Americans appear more vulnerable to COVID-19, due to poorer access to health care and other factors, but the poll found that only 25% of blacks and 37% of Hispanics would get a vaccine, compared to 56% of whites, the AP reported.

Currently, labs around the world are dedicated to developing a vaccine in record time. About a dozen viable candidates are currently being studied, and British researchers will soon begin a clinical trial of a candidate vaccine in over 10,000 people.

In the meantime, the Trump administration has launched "Operation Warp Speed" to quicken delivery of more than 300 million units of vaccine, but the poll found that only 20% of respondents thought a vaccine would be ready by the end of 2020.

More information

For guidelines on shielding yourself from the new coronavirus, head to the CDC.